Expanding Upon A Theme From A Current Work In A Future Story

GRANT'S ANGUISH

GRANT’S ANGUISH

When recently editing a novella, a number of thoughts entered my mind about lengthening certain scenes in the story, and the overall effect of actually doing this. Would it be viable for the story, or unnecessarily take away its power by becoming redundant? One of the characters in the novella was contemplating committing adultery, and meets someone who gives him another perspective about this. Looking at the story as a whole, I decided that pursuing this would not be beneficial to the current story, as it would be introducing another character to the fray at a late stage, and I did not go ahead with this angle. This experience, though, did take matters into another direction for me story-wise.

I thought that this would be a good starting point for another story, entirely unrelated to the story from which the idea originated. Pursuing a separate story would give more space to develop another set of characters and explore their situation, which would have been impossible in the other story. The other story is a multi-character and generational narrative, while the newer book would explore the themes of marital discord and adultery in a more intense manner, with less characters, giving dimension to three characters instead of eight. I was also fortunate to find an image fitting what I envisioned for the main protagonist for the purposes of the book, GRANT’S ANGUISH, and the cover is above. (GRANT’S ANGUISH will be available in the future)

What I have learned from this is that if you feel a current story has themes you would like to deal with in another book, do not hesitate, just go with the flow, and write another story. If you do not do this, you may be shortchanging yourself of an opportunity to analyse concepts and characters that would be very much worth exploring in detail.

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